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ICAE Newsletter

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Volume 27 No.2[6.0MB] Nov 2016
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER

This is a negative upward connecting leader of a downward positive CG lightning discharge that caused severe damage to the blade of a windmill. The picture was one frame of the high-speed video taken at Uchinada, Japan by using Photron camera operated at 300000 fps. The detailed description of the lightning flash can be found in the ICLP2016 paper titled “A positive lightning discharge that caused severe damage to the blade of a windmill” by Daohong Wang, Norio Sawamura and Nobuyuki Takagi of Gifu University, Japan.
A black-and-white version is here. [3.9 MB]
 
Volume 27 No.1[3.5MB] May 2016
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER

A complex winter IC lightning flash that triggered an upward lightning discharge from a wind turbine at Uchinada, Japan as seen by LIVE (Lightning Imaging via. VHF Emission). In the still image, the beginning of the flash is shown in blue, the middle green, and the end red. The majority of the lightning channels were produced by negative breakdown, with several channels growing at the same time. VHF emission from this type of growth tends to interfere with itself, making both interferometric and time-of-arrival mapping more difficult. The upward flash began at 158.4 ms (green in the still figure), and produced bright, continuous VHF emission. Study of this and other Japanese winter lightning flashes is ongoing. The complexity of this flash is not unusual in comparison to other winter flashes, showing that there is still quite a lot to learn about Japanese winter lightning. Video is provided by Michael Stock, RAIRAN Pte. Ltd., Japan.
A black-and-white version is here. [2.4 MB]
 
Volume 26 No.2[2.6MB] Nov 2015
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
Attachment process of two negative first strokes in natural lightning imaged with a high-speed video camera at the Lightning Observatory in Gainesville (LOG), Florida. Shown in (a) is the break-through (final-jump) phase. The faintly luminous formation (FLF) is a common streamer zone with an estimated average electric field of about 0.3-0.4 MV/m. Shown in (b) is most likely an 11-m-long positive UCL with a long streamer zone. In both cases the return stroke occurred in the next frame. About one-third of 50 examined records showed FLFs as seen in (a) and (b). Adapted from a paper published in JGR by M.D. Tran and V.A. Rakov (University of Florida).
A black-and-white version is here. [1.1 MB]
 
Volume 26 No.1[3.6 MB] May 2015
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
Comment on the photo above: A cloud-to-ground lightning discharge with multiple ground terminations viewed by using a VHF radiation location system. During its preliminary breakdown process, two leader channels formed and progressed simultaneously. One of them transformed into a stepped leader which propagated downwards with branches and eventually caused the first return stroke. Interestingly, the second return stroke leader spread along the other channel of the preliminary breakdown, and therefore resulted in a multiple channel flash (MCF). Both of the first and second return strokes themselves are multiple-ground terminations strokes (MGTSs). This figure, including the discharge's animation (an attached file), is provided by Zhuling Sun, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing. Adapted from a paper submitted to JGR by Sun et al., 2015.
A black-and-white version is here. [3.6 MB]
 
Volume 25 No.2[2.6MB] Nov 2014
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
A lightning flash that lasted 7.74 seconds. You can watch its animation at http://lightning.nmt.edu/ICAE/France_Flash.gif. In the figure, an "X" is a +CG stroke located by the EUCLID lightning detection network; a "" is a EUCLID detected -CG (This was a +CG flash, so there were probably no -CG strokes. The ""s were probably mis-classified cloud pulses.); a "*" is a EUCLID detected +IC pulse. The figure and the animation were provided by Bill Rison, New Mexico Tech with support from Eric Defer of LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Paris, France, who was the one who worked to get the LMA to France, and Stephane Pedeboy of Météorage, Pau, France, who provided the EUCLID data.
A black-and-white version is here. [1.1 MB]
 
Volume 25 No.1[1.2MB] May 2014
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
Cloud-to-air negative leaders of intracloud flashes allow for the photographic imaging of weakly luminous streamer phenomena, as there is no return stroke producing bright light emissions and causing image saturation. Also, such leaders can propagate well out of the cloud, contrasting with a dark sky background. This photograph from a study by Edens et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett. 41, 2014) shows a negative leader that emerged from the cloud and propagated upward to 10.3 km altitude before terminating. Streamers constituting corona brushes are resolved along the leader channel, as well as an unconnected space leader with attached streamers that shows the leader step formation in progress.
A black-and-white version is here. [1.4 MB]
 
Volume 24 No.2[0.98MB] Nov 2013
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
A recent study by Shao, Lay and Jacobson (Nature-Geoscience, 6, 2013) shows that lightning flashes in a small thunderstorm reduces electron density in the nighttime ionospheric D-region. This plot shows a snapshot of the affected D-region electron density profiles atop the storm, at a time when the underlying storm was at its most lightning active stage. The rainbow colors represent electron densities in a logarithmic scale, as shown by the color bar.
A black-and-white version is here. [1.3 MB]
 
Volume 24 No.1[1.28MB] May 2013
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
X-band Phased Array Radar (PAR) installed at the top of a building in Suita Campus, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan, and time series of the 3 dimensional thunderstorm structure captured by the PAR system in every 2 minutes, showing how the thunderstorm structure changes in a short time. Actual temporal resolution of the PAR system is 10 to 30 seconds for 60 km range and the continuous images of the evolution of the thunderstorm can be obtained with the developed system. One of the scientific results using the PAR with lightning location system appears in Wu et al. GRL, 2013.
A black-and-white version is here. [0.78 MB]
 
Volume 23 No.2[1.43MB] Nov 2012
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
LMA source locations and channel base current for an unusual triggered lightning flash at the UF/FIT International Center for Lightning Research and Testing at Camp Blanding, FL. The triggering process with its upward positive leader curiously led to the initiation of an intracloud discharge from the top of the lower negative charge region into the upper positive charge region, with some of the charge from the upper positive center flowing to ground, reversing the normal direction of current flow at ground. The LMA sources of the negative upward leader which initiates the cloud discharge are shown on the bottom left figure in red dots just prior to the current reversal. Adapted from a paper to be submitted for publication by Hill, Pilkey, Uman, Jordan (UF), Rison, Krehbiel (New Mexico Tech), Biggerstaff, Highland (OU), and Blakeslee (NASA).
A black-and-white version is here. [1.01 MB]
 
Volume 23 No.1[1.48MB] May 2012
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
Do positive and negative lightning look different? Please compare the two images taken with a digital still camera using 20 sec exposures. For the +CG, there was prolific recoil leader activity on the positive leader branches where you see many branches near the tips. The more erratic leader directional change is apparent in the negative leaders of the -CG flash. The negative leader branches also remain bright and do not branch profusely near their tips. The photos and the caption are contributed by Tom A. Warner, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology..
A black-and-white version is here. [0.73 MB]
 
Volume 22 No.2[2.21MB] Nov 2011
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
The rocket-triggered lightning flash on August 3, 2010, mapped by the Lightning Mapping Array of NMT Langmuir Laboratory. Positive leaders of the flash extended into the mid-level negative charge region situated between 5 to 7 km altitude. Multiple dart leaders occurred through the channel to ground, retracing the paths of positive breakdown.
A black-and-white version is here. [1.32 MB]
 
Volume 22 No.1 May 2011
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
The radar echo and the overlaid 3D lightning mapping of an isolated thunderstorm during its developing stage 6 minutes in Qinghai-Tibet plateau area.
Youtube lightning Animationt
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wd34RStIVPI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhnADxyncuI
The animations were generated by a MATLAB software called StormAnalysis.
 
Volume 21 No.2 November 2010
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
Image of a gigantic jet at its leading jet phase, above a thunderstorm east of Réunion Island.
Greetings from the IAMAS General-secretariat
 
Volume 21 No.1 May 2010
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
Intense lightning activity during the explosive eruption of the Mt. Redoubt volcano in Alaska at 23:20 UTC on 28 March 2009. The lightning began over Redoubt (marked with white cross-hairs) and continued for 40 min as the plume drifted 70 km eastward towards the Kenai Peninsula coast.
DEDICATION
    Charles B. Moore, October 20, 1920 - March 2, 2010
 
Volume 20 No.2 November 2009
  SPECIAL SESSION OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
History of the Lightning Mapping Array
    Paul Krehbiel (New Mexico Tech.)
 
Volume 20 No.1 May 2009
  SPECIAL SESSION OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
Recollections on the Origin of the Newsletter of Atmospheric Electricity
    Earle Williams (MIT)
What have we achieved in the past 20 years? And what can we expect in the next 20 years?
    Daohong Wang (Gifu Univ.)
 
Volume 19 No.2 November 2008
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
A comparison between radar echo and LINET locations of lightning during a 2 min time period centered around the radar scan for a hailstorm observed in Southern Germany on 29 June 2005 at 13:22 UTC. by Hans D. Betz, taken from a recent publication (H.‐D. Betz, K. Schmidt, B. Fuchs, P. Oettinger and H. Hoeller, JOLR, Vol.2, p.1.17, 2007).
 
Volume 19 No.1 May 2008
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
A pair of pets? or monsters? Are they hovering on a big fire? This photo was taken by a small group of high school students from Gizan High School of Gifu Prefecture of Japan during a Japanese winter thunderstorm as part of so called “Super‐Science‐High‐School” activity that was financially supported by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan.
 
Volume 18 No.2 November 2007
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
A behemoth of lightning flash that was artificially triggered to a test-windmill-blade in Japanese winter thunderstorm using rocket-wire technique by Prof.Sumi, Chubu University of Japan. The total electric charge lowered by this lightning flash to the ground is +500 C. The photo was taken at the ending stage of the lightning flash.
 
Volume 18 No.1 May 2007
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
Early stage of a typical thunderstorm on central Tibetan Plateau. The mean lifetime is usually about 30 minutes, and flash rate is about 1-2 fl/min.
 
Volume 17 No.2 November 2006
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
Oscar caught this spectacular sprite photo at Mont Aigoual on September 11th night, during the 2006 eurosprite campaign, by using his digtal camera (Canon EOS 5D). This story behind thee photo is available on the blog: http://eurosprite.blogspot.com/2006/09/photo-of-red-sprite.html
 
Volume 17 No.1 May 2006
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
Serge Soula, Marie-Falante, Fuadeloupe, France.
 
Volume 16 No.2 November 2005
  COVER PICTURE OF ICAE NEWSLETTER
Oscar Van der Velde, Wageningen, Nederland.
 
Volume 16 No.1 May 2005
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Volume 15 No.2 November 2004
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Volume 15 No.1 May 2004
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Volume 14 No.2 November 2003
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Volume 14 No.1 May 2003
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Volume 13 No.2 November 2002
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Volume 13 No.1 May 2002
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Volume 12 No.2 November 2001
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Volume 12 No.1 May 2001
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Volume 11 No.2 November 2000
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Volume 11 No.1 May 2000
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Volume 10 No.2 November 1999
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Last Update: November 26, 2015
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